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fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

By Carlos Latuff

(via bkcarib)

Because today we live in a society in which spurious realities are manufactured by the media, by governments, by big corporations, by religious groups, political groups… So I ask, in my writing, What is real? Because unceasingly we are bombarded with pseudo-realities manufactured by very sophisticated people using very sophisticated electronic mechanisms. I do not distrust their motives; I distrust their power. They have a lot of it. And it is an astonishing power: that of creating whole universes, universes of the mind. I ought to know. I do the same thing.
Philip K. Dick (via theministryoftruth)

(via buffleheadcabin)

By putting government and politics into the center of economic analysis, Polanyi makes it clear that today’s vexing economic problems are almost entirely political problems. This can effectively change the terms of modern political debate: Both left and right today focus on “deregulation”—for the right it is a rallying cry against the impediments of government; for the left it is the scourge behind our current economic inequities. While they differ dramatically on its desirability, both positions assume the possibility of a “non-regulated” or “non-political” market. Taking Polanyi seriously means rejecting the illusion of a “deregulated” economy. What happened in the name of “deregulation” has actually been “reregulation,” this time by rules and policies that are radically different from those of the New Deal and Great Society decades. Although compromised by racism, those older regulations laid the groundwork for greater equality and a flourishing middle class. Government continues to regulate, but instead of acting to protect workers, consumers, and citizens, it devised new policies aimed to help giant corporate and financial institutions maximize their returns through revised anti-trust laws, seemingly bottomless bank bailouts, and increased impediments to unionization.

The implications for political discourse are critically important: If regulations are always necessary components of markets, we must not discuss regulation versus deregulation but rather what kinds of regulations we prefer: Those designed to benefit wealth and capital? Or those that benefit the public and common good?

Great explanation by Teun A. van Dijk,

I firmly believe in small gestures: pay for their coffee, hold the door for strangers, over tip, smile or try to be kind even when you don’t feel like it, pay compliments, chase the kid’s runaway ball down the sidewalk and throw it back to him, try to be larger than you are— particularly when it’s difficult. People do notice, people appreciate. I appreciate it when it’s done to (for) me. Small gestures can be an effort, or actually go against our grain (“I’m not a big one for paying compliments…”), but the irony is that almost every time you make them, you feel better about yourself. For a moment life suddenly feels lighter, a bit more Gene Kelly dancing in the rain.
Jonathan Carroll (via onlinecounsellingcollege)

(via nezua)

Sometimes the very greatest power is exercised without having to ask, because to ask would be to state the blindingly obvious and thereby diminish the very power which is being displayed. Just as Mr Murdoch’s editors knew the basic ground-rules, so did politicians.

Ramadan kicks off this weekend and that means that Muslims playing the knockout stages of the World Cup will have to decide whether they will fast or not. Algeria manager Vahid Halilhodzic held a meeting with his medical staff last night to determine to what extent it would be possible for his players to play to their maximum if they didn’t eat during daylight hours. His team, remember, will proceed to the next round if they avoid defeat against Russia in their last match. Many other countries will have similar concerns, including perhaps Iran, who will remember than one of their former players, Ali Karimi, was sacked by his Tehran-based club back home when it emerged that he decided against fasting in 2010. The last time the World Cup coincided with Ramadan was in 1986.

http://www.theguardian.com/football/blog/2014/jun/25/world-cup-2014-day-14-live

Football and religion

So cool

language is a technology: it can be used to do things; but it is no simple or single-purpose tool. It is the ultimate Swiss Army knife, with a different implement for every use or purpose we can dream up. In our daily lives we use language to ask, amuse, inform, tell, demand, propose, and on and on through an endless list of routine rhetorical goals. At a more sophisticated level, and in complex collaboration with others, we use this basic quality of language to shape specific results: we design and regulate language practices in law to produce justice, in governance to produce policy, in education to produce learning, in business to produce profits, and in science to produce new knowledge. Within the university, we shape modes and methods of disciplinary inquiry, at the heart of which are the language forms and practices that help us produce the specialized knowledge we need and value. Different rhetorics create different knowledges.
Outta timin

Outta timin

What’s cool about terraced housing is the trees and bushy gardens at the heart of each block.

radicalreboot:

by Brian Dominick

I’ve finally managed to get to the root of the Sarah Kendzior/Amber A’Lee Frost/Jacobin magazine controversy that has been lighting up my Twitter feed with all kinds of convoluted confusion for days now, and it’s weirder than anyone I’ve seen is even pointing out.

If you’re…