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Posts tagged "ideology"
The construction of straightness also calls into question research on the biological basis of sexual orientation; the quest to identify a “gay chromosome” or hormonal level implies the existence of an identifiable control of a biologically straight person, which, if heterosexuality is an invented cultural construct, doesn’t necessarily exist.
I think that anthropology (and the other social sciences) are the ideological arms of sociopolitical arrangements. I use ideology here not in the narrow sense of propaganda, but in the sense of pervasive idea system making up a world view that both reflects and molds certain social arrangements. In general, scholarship reflects and molds the sociopolitical system called a university, and universities are not independent from our social order, but are paid and organized to perpetuate and legitimize it.
Esther Newton (1940~), Mother Camp (via literary-ethnography)

If I were to offer a small criticism of Bonds of Empire, then, it is Rush’s acceptance of this supremacy of Britishness over alternative cutural forms. This also influences the language she uses when describing historical events: passive word choices remove the horrors and violence of the colonial encounter. The title Bonds of Empire itself, which suggests linkages and an echo of fraternity, might be equally understood to refer to “bonds” in the financial sense: a debt to the Mother Country where ownership over local development and self-determination are directed by foreign cultural ideals, or what the French sociologist Pierre Bourdieu called cultural capital. That is how empire works, as imperialism socialises those it makes war on and conquers their inner world — their “biopolitics.” Empire enforces itself inside the minds and cultures of ex-colonies. Hence when Rush writes of decolonialisation she masks the process of neocolonialism and the personal politics involved in such a relationship. Her tale omits the cultural disciplining that such “bonds” demand as payment for success, and presents them instead as free choice; what’s more, as the best choice for all. I would venture that such choice eroded authentic forms of Caribbean self-determination and independence, rather than the other way around.

Empire is based on the theft and accumulation of wealth. This power tries to hide its tyranny by claiming to leave behind positives — in many ways, Rush implies that independence and democracy were such gifts. This is problematic because of what it hides: entrenched poverty; wealth in the hands of a few; private enterprises and public industries still run on a plantation mentality, with their surpluses leaving the country. It is quite clear that the populations of the urban slums of the Caribbean and ex-colonies further afield refute the notion that “bonds of empire” have done anything to transform poverty. Instead, one might argue that Britishness and bonds of empire have helped entrench global class inequalities

http://caribbeanreviewofbooks.com/crb-archive/28-november-2011/best-of-british/

Students who acquire large debts putting themselves through school are unlikely to think about changing society. When you trap people in a system of debt they can’t afford the time to think. Tuition fee increases are a “disciplinary technique,” and, by the time students graduate, they are not only loaded with debt, but have also internalized the “disciplinarian culture.” This makes them efficient components of the consumer economy.

Noam Chomsky (via cultureofresistance)

Also interesting in the context of how States have moved away from providing free education over the last decade

(via revolucion94)

And by the way, if they can track every penny of every transaction via PIN numbers and ATM cards, how come we still don’t have a voting machine that everyone can use? Believe me, if counting votes was as important as counting money, they wouldn’t miss a single ballot.
Mark Bloch, Interview with Linda Lambertson (2008). (via emanationsoftheyellowsign)
The stress on ‘war of position’ in the Prison Notebooks must be set in its historical context. It is a metaphor designed to hammer home a concrete political point—the revolutionary will of a few thousand revolutionaries at a time of crisis does not create the preconditions for a successful insurrection. These preconditions have to be prepared by a long process of political intervention and ideological struggle.

futurejournalismproject:

Jon Stewart.

Chris Wallace.

Media Criticism.

So what’s your proof again about the ‘partisan agenda’ and what I do? That’s the embarrassment. The embarrassment is that I’m given credibility in this world because of the disappointment that the public has in what the news media does.

Very good

As it happened, the political operatives of the Bush administration became aware of the Enlightenment fallacy long before I did. People like me, misguided by that fallacy, believed that the propaganda methods described in George Orwell’s 1984 could prevail only in a dictatorship. They knew better. Frank Luntz, the well-known right-wing political consultant, proudly acknowledged that he used 1984 as his textbook in designing his catchy slogans. And Karl Rove reportedly claimed that he didn’t have to study reality; he could create it. The adoption of Orwellian techniques gave the Republican propaganda machine a competitive advantage in electoral politics. The other side has tried to catch up with them but has been hampered by a lingering attachment to the pursuit of truth.

buffleheadcabin:

ournalist Chris Hedges discusses his recent book Empire of Illusion: the End of Literacy and the Triumph of Spectacle. In it, he charts the dramatic rise of a post-literate society that craves fantasy, ecstasy, and illusion. Hedges argues we now live in two societies: one, the minority, functions in a print-based, literate world and can cope with complexity and can separate illusion from truth; the other, a growing majority, is retreating from a reality-based world into one of false certainty and magic where serious film and theater, as well as newspapers and books, are being pushed to the margins.

(via mlq3)

Those of you who have been through college know that the educational system is highly geared to rewarding conformity and obedience; if you don’t do that, you are a troublemaker. So, it is kind of a filtering device which ends up with people who really, honestly (they aren’t lying) internalize the framework of belief and attitudes of the surrounding power system in the society.
Noam Chomsky (via noam-chomsky)

(via liberationfrequency)

"I haven’t read Owen Jones’ new bookChavs, which is garnering rave reviews in the press, but we know the problem that it addresses. Briefly that, in the last generation or so, there has been a conscious effort on the part of the ruling class to obliterate class as a political-ideological category, and a basis for political action. And, concurrent with this there has been a rise in more or less explicit forms of class chauvinism, some of it expressed in the obnoxious ideologeme, ‘chavs’. Only an era which has revived Victorian attitudes concerning ‘respectability’ and the ‘deserving poor’, in which poverty is habitually pathologised and ‘wealth creators’ extolled, could we have a flesh and blood Etonian of royal pedigree in Number Ten. Over the last dozen or so years, there has been a substantial rise in inegalitarian political attitudes, a drop in support for redistribution and, confluently, a more modest but real drop in the number of people who think of themselves as being ‘working class’.”

mindfulpleasures:

Developing this perspective enables Althusser to unmask ideological factors underlying a number of conceptions of subject. Among his favorite targets are the autonomous subject, the humanist theory of man, and the discourse of the imaginary. Althusser holds that the primary act of ideological interpellation is to fix “individuals” in place as subjects for a certain “meaning.” The creation of subject in and through discourse (i.e., in philosophic systems, literary representations, psychological theories etc.) produces a subjectivity subjected to certain meanings and explanatory paradigms which control the relationship individuals form to their experience. This is the most significant ideological operation because its function is to close the subject off from the perception and movements of contradictions.

mindfulpleasures:

Developing this perspective enables Althusser to unmask ideological factors underlying a number of conceptions of subject. Among his favorite targets are the autonomous subject, the humanist theory of man, and the discourse of the imaginary. Althusser holds that the primary act of ideological interpellation is to fix “individuals” in place as subjects for a certain “meaning.” The creation of subject in and through discourse (i.e., in philosophic systems, literary representations, psychological theories etc.) produces a subjectivity subjected to certain meanings and explanatory paradigms which control the relationship individuals form to their experience. This is the most significant ideological operation because its function is to close the subject off from the perception and movements of contradictions.

(via mindfulpleasures-deactivated201)

What could be cleverer as a way of quelling dissent than to tell people who are in some kind of trouble - poverty, unemployment, etc. - that it’s all their attitude? That that’s all that has to change. That they should just get with the program, smile, and…no complaining. It’s a brilliant form of social control, which, by the way, was practiced in the Soviet Union. One of the principles of Soviet Communism was optimism. It’s a form of social control that has been quite widespread in totalitarian types of societies, but I think it has worked very well in America. Take the problem of class inequality: how can that be a problem if anyone can become rich just by thinking about it?